A supportive climate and low strain promote well-being and sustainable working life in the operation theatre

  • Robert Wålinder Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
  • Roma Runeson-Broberg Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
  • Erebouni Arakelian Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
  • Tobias Nordqvist Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
  • Andreas Runeson Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
  • Anna Rask-Andersen Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
Keywords: Anaesthetist, job demandcontrol- support model, hospital, nurse, occupational, operating room, psychosocial, zest for work

Abstract

Background: Shortage of health-care workers e.g. in operating theatres is a global problem. A shortage of staff negatively affects patient outcomes, making it important to keep the employees from quitting. The aim of this survey was to study if well-being, zest for work, and thoughts about leaving work in an operating theatre can be related to the psychosocial work environment, as described by the job demand-control-support (JDCS) model.

Methods: A questionnaire was provided to personnel in operating theatres of seven Swedish hospitals (n = 1405, with a response rate of 68%) that included the JDCS model, personal factors, work ability, well-being, zest for work, and thoughts about leaving their position. Ordinal scale regression was used for analyses.

Results: A majority reported moderate to high zest for work (76%). A minority (30%) had sometimes thought during at least one month in the last year of leaving their position. Lower social support scores and high demands together with low control (high-strain) scores were related to lower well-being, lower zest for work, and more thoughts about leaving the position. Anaesthetists scored in the low-strain field, nurse anaesthetists and assistant nurses in the passive field, and operating nurses in the active field, in comparison to all personnel.

Conclusion: According to the JDCS model, both lower social support and high strain were related to lower well-being and negative thoughts about the position. Social support scores were about the same for different occupational groups in the operating theatre, and no occupation scored on average in the high-strain field.

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Published
2018-08-07
How to Cite
Wålinder, R., Runeson-Broberg, R., Arakelian, E., Nordqvist, T., Runeson, A., & Rask-Andersen, A. (2018). A supportive climate and low strain promote well-being and sustainable working life in the operation theatre. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, 123(3), 183–190. https://doi.org/10.1080/03009734.2018.1483451
Section
Original Articles