Lack of Correlation between the Grade of Methacholine-Induced Bronchial Hyperreactivity and Ipratropium Bronchodilation in Asthmatics

  • Hans Hedenström Departments of Clinical Physiology and Lung Medicine, Uppsala University, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden
  • Thomas Wegener Departments of Clinical Physiology and Lung Medicine, Uppsala University, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden

Abstract

In 46 never-smoking randomly chosen patients with non-allergic asthma, 40 to 60 years old, a methacholine hyperreactivity test and lung function tests were performed after inhalation of different doses of ipratropium bromide (IB). The grade of hyperreactivity was measured as the cumulative dose of methacholine necessary to produce a decrease in the forced expiratory volume in one second of 20% of the lowest post-NaCl value (PD20). The following lung function tests were carried out: Lung volumes, ventilatory capacity including flow-volume curves, airway resistance and nitrogen single-breath wash-out test. The bronchodilator effect, measured as a change in the different lung function tests for different doses of IB given (0.08 mg, 0.15 mg and 0.25 mg), was correlated to the grade of hyperreactivity (PD20 dose). No or only a slight correlation was found between the grade of methacholine-induced hyperreactivity and the bronchodilator effects of the different doses of IB. These results indicate a lack of correlation between an anticholinergic bronchodilator effect and the grade of methacholine-induced bronchial hyperreactivity, or possibly an insensitivity of the above-mentioned methacholine test.

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Published
1988-09-01
How to Cite
Hedenström, H., & Wegener, T. (1988). Lack of Correlation between the Grade of Methacholine-Induced Bronchial Hyperreactivity and Ipratropium Bronchodilation in Asthmatics. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, 93(1), 71-80. https://doi.org/10.1517/03009734000000040
Section
Original Articles