Heparin-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits and 25% reduction of heparin dose in coronary artery surgery—a clinical study

  • Jan Borowiec
  • Stefan Thelin
  • Lars Bagge
  • Jan van der Linden
  • Eva Thörnö
  • Hans-Erik Hansson

Abstract

Cardiopulmonary bypass with systemic heparinization causes trauma to blood cells and coagulation defects. Artificial surfaces could be coated by end-linkage binding of heparin (Carmeda Bioactive Surface, CBAS™). Use of such surfaces during cardiopulmonary bypass in animals resulted in less postoperative blood loss and better preservation of blood cells. In this study heparin-coated circuits were employed during coronary artery grafting in 7 patients (Group HC). Concomitantly, the heparin dose was reduced by 25% and an activated clotting time (ACT) of 3 00 sec was accepted. Additional 7 patients were operated with standard circuits (Group C), requiring ACT above 400 sec with normal doses of heparin. There were no thromboembolic complications in Group HC. The postoperative bleeding was generally low and without significant intergroup differences. Coagulation parameters displayed significantly lower ACT and anti-Factor Xa during bypass in Group HC. A tendency towards less blood cell trauma was observed with heparin-coated circuits. The protamine dose could be reduced by 50%, which significantly reduced the protamine/heparin quotient. This study indicates that routine cardiopulmonary bypass could be performed safely with heparin-coated circuits and reduced intravenous doses of heparin and protamine. It is suggested that the use of heparin-coated circuits may lead to less blood cell trauma.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Published
1992-03-01
How to Cite
Borowiec, J., Thelin, S., Bagge, L., van der Linden, J., Thörnö, E., & Hansson, H.-E. (1992). Heparin-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits and 25% reduction of heparin dose in coronary artery surgery—a clinical study. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, 97(1), 55-66. https://doi.org/10.3109/03009739209179282
Section
Original Articles